Fall Oregon News: AAUW-OR YouTube is a Wealth of Resources

August is the time when Oregon AAUW typically holds a Summer Leadership meeting.  We held the last one in person in August 2019 at Western Oregon University.  Since then, our meetings have been on Zoom (remember Summer Skills Camp, Summer Skills Camp 2.1 and Continuing Education?), and we had more sessions than we would have if we had met in person. Our brilliant Events Coordinator/Zoom Guru, Nancy Brown, has recorded (and carefully edited!) and posted over 35 sessions on YouTube.

In June 2022, at our first in-person board meeting in two and a half years, the Board agreed that we should hold off on a summer meeting and instead re-introduce you to the wonders of Zoom/YouTube so that you could explore the topics that interest you at your own pace. After you view sessions, we encourage you to talk with your colleagues, state officers, and other branches to discuss what you learned and what you want help with.

To help you determine what you might be interested in, we have arranged the YouTube presentations by general category. The list is not comprehensive, but once you get on our YouTube channel (AAUW of Oregon YouTube), you will see other programs you might want to view. Besides the training events, there are videos of annual meetings, awards celebrations, special branch programs and lobby events.

Note: AAUW Oregon YouTube is at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJOb-EcZjf55EiP_r8upeYQ. When we get 100 subscribers, we can get a custom URL that is easier to find. So, please subscribe if you haven’t already.)

Programs related to leadership

  • Making Meetings Worthwhile and Fun – 8/19/20
  • What Do AAUW State and National Do For Us? – 8/8/20
  • Exemplary Branch Programs – 8/22/20
  • Where Will We Find Our Next Leaders? – 8/13/20
  • AAUW Membership Matters – 8/15/20
  • Roberts Rules of Order & Mock Meeting – 10/26/20
  • Leadership Succession – 11/16/20
  • AAUW Fund: How to Support AAUW and Why – 12/10/20
  • How to Build/Rebuild a Branch – 1/6/21
  • AAUW Five Star Program – 1/14/21
  • Mission Related Programs – 1/20/21
  • Town Hall with AAUW Board Chair Julia Brown – 3/22/21
  • Care and Feeding of Volunteers – 8/18/21
  • Successful Branch Projects – 11/3/21
  • Meet AAUW CEO Gloria Blackwell – 1/24/22

Diversity, Equity and Inclusion/Anti-Racism

  • The Votes for Women Movement in Oregon and the Continuing Struggle for Democracy and Human Rights – 8/9/20
  • The Work We Need to Do – 8/11/20
  • What Needs to Change? – 10/28/20
  • Traumatic Real Origins of Thanksgiving – 12/1/20
  • Bias and Hate and What the Oregon DOJ is Doing – 1/29/21
  • How Far We Have Come – 1/4/21
  • Coalition Building for Oregon’s Latinx Families – 2/21/21
  • Critical Race Theory – 8/23/21

Communications/Technology

  • Tech Talk with Nancy: Using Zoom – 10/19/20
  • Tech Talk with Nancy: Facebook Pages & Mailchimp – 5/6/21
  • Mailchimp – 12/14/20
  • Instagram for Branches – 1/17/21
  • Tech Talk with Nancy: Instagram Posting from a Computer – 3/13/21
  • Tech Office Hours with Lily – 12/6/21
  • Working Effectively with Social Media to Promote Your Branch – 8/10/21
  • Website Fundamentals – 8/19/21
  • Is Mailchimp for Your Branch? – 8/25/21

Inspirational

  • Prof. Kimberly Jensen keynote: The Votes for Women Movement in Oregon – 8/3/20
  • Mindful Activism and Self Care – 8/15/20
  • Multnomah County Commissioner Jessica Vega Pederson keynote – 4/20/21
  • Why We Are in AAUW: STEM with West Linn High School Robotics Team – 8/16/21
  • Downsizing: Don’t Let Stuff Stop You – 8/26/21
  • Aging Gracefully – 4/8/22
  • Rep. Pam Marsh Keynote: Bridging the Gap – 4/8/22
  • AAUW CEO Gloria Blackwell Opening Remarks – 4/9/22

Fall Oregon News: On the Ballot

There will be four referenda on this November’s ballot. Here they are for your perusal as well as the pros and cons to aid your choice in voting. We all know AAUW members excel at making our voices heard at the ballot box.

Oregon Measure 111, the Right to Healthcare Amendment, is on the ballot in Oregon as a legislatively referred constitutional amendment on November 8, 2022.[1]

  • A “yes” vote supports amending the state constitution to require that the state “ensure that every resident of Oregon has access to cost-effective, clinically appropriate and affordable health care as a fundamental right.”
  • A “no” vote opposes amending the state constitution to require that the state “ensure that every resident of Oregon has access to cost-effective, clinically appropriate and affordable health care as a fundamental right.”

Measure 111 would add a section to the Oregon Constitution establishing a right to “cost-effective, clinically appropriate and affordable health care” for every Oregon resident. The amendment would require the state to balance the obligation of ensuring a right to healthcare against funding public schools and other essential public services. The amendment also states that legal remedies for lawsuits brought against the proposed section may not interfere with the balance between a right to healthcare and funding other essential public services.

This bill is widely supported but has no funding mechanism or plan for implementation. It would be the first adopted by any state to secure the right to affordable health care for all state residents.

Oregon Measure 112, the Remove Slavery as Punishment for Crime from Constitution Amendment, is on the ballot in Oregon as a legislatively referred constitutional amendment on November 8, 2022.[1]

  • A “yes” vote supports: repealing language from the state constitution that allows the use of slavery and involuntary servitude as criminal punishments and adding language that authorizes an Oregon court or a probation or parole agency to order alternatives to incarceration for a convicted individual as part of their sentencing.
  • A “no” vote opposes this amendment to repeal language from the state constitution that prohibits slavery or involuntary servitude except as punishment for a crime.

Measure 112 would remove language in the Oregon Constitution that allows the use of slavery and involuntary servitude as criminal punishments, thereby prohibiting slavery and involuntary servitude without exception. The amendment would also add language authorizing an Oregon court or a probation or parole agency to order alternatives to incarceration for a convicted individual as part of their sentencing.[2]

As of January 2021, Oregon was one of 10 states that had a provision prohibiting enslavement and involuntary servitude but with an exception for criminal punishments.

Oregon Measure 113, the Exclusion from Re-election for Legislative Absenteeism Initiative, is on the ballot in Oregon as an initiated constitutional amendment on November 8, 2022.[1][2]

  • A “yes” vote supports disqualifying legislators from re-election following the end of their term if they are absent from 10 legislative floor sessions without permission or excuse.
  • A “no” vote opposes disqualifying legislators from re-election following the end of their term if they are absent from 10 legislative floor sessions without permission or excuse.

The measure is well supported financially and by a variety of state officials, unions and public service organizations.

Oregon Measure 114, the Changes to Firearm Ownership and Purchase Requirements Initiative, is on the ballot in Oregon as an initiated state statute on November 8, 2022.

  • A “yes” vote supports this ballot initiative to: require permits issued by local law enforcement to buy a firearm; require photo ID, fingerprints, safety training, criminal background check, and fee payment to apply for a permit; and criminalize the manufacture, importation, possession, use, purchase, sale, or transfer of ammunition magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds.
  • A “no” vote opposes this ballot initiative thereby maintaining existing law, which requires a seller/transferor to request a background check before firearm purchase.

Measure 114 would enact a law outlining a procedure to apply for a permit to purchase a firearm. Permits would be issued by local law enforcement. Applicants would need to pay a fee, submit a photo ID, be fingerprinted, complete approved safety training, pass a criminal background check, and not be prohibited from possessing firearms. Law enforcement would be able to deny a permit to an applicant believed to be a danger to oneself or others. The initiative would also criminalize the manufacture, importation, possession, use, purchase, sale, or otherwise transferring of ammunition magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds.[1]

Because this measure is controversial and being followed nationwide, here is what a yes or no vote means:

  • Result of Yes vote: Yes vote requires a background check, safety training, state police to maintain new permit/firearm database; prohibits certain size magazines.
  • Result of No Vote: No vote retains current law, Seller/transferor must request criminal background check; permit, safety course not required; no magazine capacity restrictions.

Fall Oregon News: Celebrating Scholarships

We’re bursting with pride at the scholarships awarded over the last year by branches from all corners of the State of Oregon.

South District

Ashland Branch

Co-Presidents Regina Ayers and Catherine Lutes

For the 2022-23 academic year, the Ashland Branch awarded nearly $33,000 in scholarships to five students at Southern Oregon University (SOU) and four students at Rogue Community College (RCC). The nine scholars will be featured at the annual Celebration of Scholars, hosted by the Branch, on September 28, at SOU.

The nine students represent a broad range of subject areas. In the SOU graduate division, one scholar is attaining her Master’s in education while two others are doing their graduate work in clinical health counseling. There are two senior SOU scholars: one majoring in chemistry and the other in biology. The four scholars attending RCC work in anthropology, allied health, general studies and human services.

The Ashland Branch raises money for the SOU and RCC scholarships through annual appeals and fundraisers. Each school’s funds are managed by its respective foundation, SOU Foundation or RCC Foundation. The Branch has supported and awarded scholarships since 1996.

Our Named Scholarship Program honors a contribution or bequest of $50,000 or more.  The three SOU Scholarships are named in perpetuity for the Katherine and Ron Lang Family, Judy Yin Shih, and the Kate and Jim Wolf-Pizor Family.

Grants Pass Branch

Co-Presidents Kay Hawkins and Nancy Lester

For the 2022-2023 academic year, the Grants Pass Branch was proud to award a total of $14,000 in scholarship money. All scholarships were for Rogue Community College students.

$2500 was awarded to the recipient of the Frog O’Faire Scholarship. AAUW Grants Pass Scholarships were awarded to five worthy recipients, each receiving $2000. Also awarded to an outstanding student was the Katherine Francis Bilas Memorial Endowed Scholarship of $1500.

Medford Branch

Co-Presidents Lisa Hughes and Carol Koszyk

For the school year 2022-2023, the Medford Branch awarded a total of $16,200 in scholarships. They gave $13,500 toward the education of women attending either Rogue Community College (RCC) or Southern Oregon University (SOU). Three $2,700 scholarships were awarded to women attending RCC; including one Technical Scholarship and two $2,700 were awarded to SOU students.

The Branch also awarded $2,700 in scholarship money to support young women so they can attend educational events that will help cultivate and challenge their curiosity like ACADEMY: a week-long camp on the SOU Campus for academically talented students completing grades five through eight and AWSEM (Advocates for Women in Science): a one-day gathering for students in grades six through eight who are interested in learning more about STEM careers. For ACADEMY, the Branch awarded three scholarships of $750 each; for AWSEM, the Branch awarded ten scholarships of $45 each.

Roseburg Branch

Co-Presidents Marisa Fink and Betty Mack

The Roseburg Branch awarded three scholarships this year to Umpqua Community College students. One of the recipients is majoring in psychology and plans to attend the University of Oregon upon completion of her Associate’s degree. Another recipient is a Certified Nursing Assistant majoring in nursing. The third recipient works full time while also completing her nursing degree.

North Central District

Gresham Area

One $3,000 scholarship to a second-year student at Mt. Hood Community College.

Hillsboro/Forest Grove

AAUW HBFG normally gives two student awards. One award is to a student that had to interrupt her higher education and has now returned to complete her degree. We also provided a scholarship to NCCWSL. Unfortunately, we did not provide funding for NCCWSL in 2022. Instead, our branch elected to provide two students awards, each $2500. The students are attending Pacific University.  In 2023, we will probably resume the student and NCCWSL funding.

Lake Oswego

Lake Oswego AAUW provided scholarship funds to Oregon Tradeswomen to provide tuition for women for an apprenticeship program in the building trades. We are pleased that this program and their director, Lisa Palermo, have received local and national attention for their program. Lisa was awarded the AAUW “Breaking Barrier’s” award and Oregon Tradeswomen were featured on the front page of the Oregonian with President Biden.

Portland

Over the last several years the Portland Branch has raised sufficient funds to provide three $1,500 scholarships each year for Portland Community College students who were following a STEM curriculum with concrete plans to achieve a four-year degree. These scholarships at PCC have been in effect for decades.

At its June 1, 2022, meeting the Portland Branch board voted to establish an AAUW Portland branch through the PCC Foundation, and transferred $10,000 from the branch account to start the endowment. The fund needs to grow to $25,000 within the next 5 years before its proceeds can award scholarships. Tax benefits for retirees, the lower maintenance cost associated with an endowment versus an annual scholarship, and the legacy aspects were all reasons to move to an endowment.

Online Branch

The Online Branch does not award scholarships to institutions of higher learning. However, we do award one scholarship to the NCCWSL Conference (National Conference for College Women Student Leaders) to a college woman leader chosen from a pool of applicants, as funds permit. The scholarship amount is for $1200 to attend the conference in person in Maryland in May. Since the conference was virtual in 2022, we did not have any applications this past year.

Tigard Area

The Tigard Area Branch is proud to be able to sponsor a student at Portland Community College. Applicants write an essay that is read by a panel of members who work together with Portland Community College to select a candidate. In the past, we have been able to support many wonderful applicants.

Seaside Branch

First Generation ( June Stromberg Scholarship)

Seaside High School recipients:

  • Two received $1500
  • One received $2000

Warrenton High School Recipients:

  • Two received $1000

Cheri Folk Leadership Award

  • One Clatsop Community Grad now attending OSU received $1000

Returning Student after Absence

  • One woman received $2000

Helen Gronquist 2nd Year returning First Generation

  • One woman received $1500

Central District

  • Albany Branch – 4 ($350 ea.) scholarships awarded to Linn Benton Community College women studying in the fields of STEM
  • Salem Branch – 1 $1000) scholarship awarded to Chemeketa Community College student studying in a field underrepresented by women (STEM)